Urban Subdivision

 
 
 
 
Number of subdivision resource consents granted in residential zones
Number of new lots created in residential zones (with RMA section 224 approval)
Number of potential lots in residential zones (pending RMA section224 approval)
 
 
 

Purpose of indicator

The level of activity and pressure on urban land resources can be gauged by the number of subdivision applications granted and number of new lots created. The mean size of new lots created can be an indicator of assumed housing density. In the past density has been reported using dwelling counts as well as lot sizes. Due to the unavailability of census dwelling count data in 2011 this measure is unable to be reported in 2012 reporting timeframes. However, it will be reported in future once census 2013 data becomes available.

Current information and trend

Subdivision consent numbers peaked in 2006/07 with a total of 50 consents granted. The number of consents applied for and granted in 2006/07 was influenced by the introduction of the development contributions policy in 2006. This meant there was a large number of consents processed in this period and also that the subsequent year showed fewer consents. Figure 1 shows that there was an increase in numbers of subdivision consents granted from 2007/08 to 2010/11, then a decline in 2011/12. This decline is believed to be caused by the current global economic climate and resulting market forces. A total of 13 subdivision consents were granted for the residential zones in 2011/12, which is an unusually low number.

Figure 2 shows the number of potential and actual lots created during the timeframe of 2006/07 to 2011/12. A period of five years is deliberately shown as granted consents must have begun within eight years of being granted to give effect to them  or the consent is considered to be lapsed. For example the granted (potential) lots in 2006/07 (12) may lapse in 2012/13 if they are not given effect to. To ‘give effect’ to a subdivision consent means that a section 223 certificate must be lodged within 5 years, then within another 3 years a section 224 certificate must be attained. Table 1 details what is needed for a s223 and s224 approval. Most subdivision consents apply for s223 and s224 approval at the same time as it is less costly and more efficient to do so.

 


 

Table 1.
Source: Resource Management Act 1991

 
Figure 1
Source: Rotorua Lakes Council 

During the period of 2006/07 to 2011/12 a total of 169 subdivision consents were granted, and a potential 557 new lots created. Of the 557 a total of 399 new lots have been actualised, meaning they have s224 approval and their titles have been issued. The remaining 158 lots remain as ‘potential’ lots pending s224 approval or they may subsequently lapse after eight years.
 
Of the 50 subdivision consents granted in 2006/07 there were a total of 133 new lots created, 121 of which have their titles issued, and 12 that are still pending section 224 approval. This means that there were a high number of consents granted, but comparatively not a large number of lots created, which is also the trend for all other years except 2007/08. For this year there were only 21 subdivision consents granted resulting in a total of 295 lots. Of these 232 gained s224 approval and had titles issued, while 63 lots are still pending s224 approval. During 2011/12 there were both a small number of consents granted and lots created. This is thought to be due to the current economic climate and resulting market forces.
 
It is likely that the influence of the introduction of the development contributions policy resulted in a large number of lots being created (peak shown in figure 2, 2007/08), which, coupled with the economic climate has possibly meant there are more lots available than the current market demand.
 
Two consents resulted in a large number of lots created. They are Eastlake subdivision (126 new lots) and a subdivision for Butler Place in Lynmore (69 new lots), both granted during 2007/08.
 
  
 
 
Figure 2
Source: Rotorua Lakes Council

 

 

 



Figure 3
Source: Rotorua Lakes Council
 
All residential subdivision consents were for properties within the Residential B and C Zones. The table below details the intended character and amenity for the residential zones, based on their purpose and density.
 


 
*These are residential zones of the Operative Rotorua District Plan.
Table 2
 
Subdivision is most likely in Residential B and C zones and least likely in Residential A zone. The Residential A Zone comprises largely Maori- owned land for which subdivision can only be approved by the Maori Land Court. There is no mandate for subdivision of Maori owned land to be processed by local government.
The Residential Lifestyle Zone is a relatively new zone created in 2010 as part of the Wharenui Road plan change. No subdivision applications or development have taken place in this zone to date. The Residential / Office zone currently has large lots, however there has been no subdivision of these lots during 2006/07 to 2011/12. A possible reason for this is that it is more economical for owners to rent premises to commercial business than subdivide the land.
Most new lots created were in the Residential B Zone (figure 3), with a small number of new lots in Residential C Zone (figure 4).
In reviewing the Operative Rotorua District Plan the issues shown in table 3 were identified for subdivision in the urban area.


Table 3


Figure 4
Source: Rotorua Lakes Council

In Summary

  • During the period of 2006/017 to 2011/12 a total of 169 subdivision consents granted, and a potential 557 new residential lots created.
  • Of the 557 a total of 399 new lots have s224 approval. The remaining 158 lots remain as ‘potential’ lots pending s224 approval
  • The number of subdivision related consents peaked in 2006/07 with a total of 50 consents granted due to the introduction of the development contributions policy.
  • Low numbers of subdivision consents following 2007/08 is likely due to the global economic climate and resulting market forces
  • Most subdivision consents in the residential environment were located in the Residential B Zone
 
Further information sources
 
To see the Operative Rotorua District Plan
Click here
 
To see the Proposed Rotorua District Plan
Click here
 
To make a submission on the Proposed Rotorua District Plan (closes 1st March 2013)
Click here
 
To see the Urban Subdivision Technical Paper
Click here PDF(1.61MB)
 
To see the Subdivision Lot Sizes Technical Paper
Click here PDF(1.55MB)
 
To see the Land Suitability and Subdivision Technical Paper
Click here PDF(2.45MB)
 
 
Page reviewed: 18 Feb 2015 2:37pm