Rural development

 
Number of resource consents granted in rural zones
Types of resource consents granted in rural zones

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Purpose of indicator

 
This indicator monitors numbers and types of resource consents to provide an understanding of the effects on amenity and what types of activities take place in the rural environment, above and beyond what is permitted by the Operative Rotorua District Plan.
 

Current information and trend

 
Most consents granted were in the Rural A Zone (figure 1), which is expected as it is the most extensive rural zone (table 1 shows rural zones of the Operative Rotorua District Plan and a description of their intent). Collectively rural zones comprise almost 75% of the district’s area. The general trend for the number of consents (figure 1) from 2006/07 to 2011/12 in the rural zones shows a gradual decrease. This is not exclusive to the rural zones, but rather is a general trend for all zones and is reflective of the economic climate and resulting market forces.


Figure 1
Source: Rotorua Lakes Council

Agriculture/ farming type activities granted in the rural zones were mainly for ‘new dairy sheds’ and ‘shed/barns’ (figure 2). Three consents were granted for a new herd home. Dairy sheds are a controlled activity in the Operative District Plan and hence require a consent. Sheds and barns in the rural zone that require a consent are likely to be located within yard buffers meaning they also require resource consent. Sheds outside of yard buffers are a permitted activity in the rural zone as long as they meet certain criteria.
While numbers of resource consents granted for agriculture/farming type activities are small there was an increase in consents granted from 2009/10 to 2011/12.
 

Figure 2
Source: Rotorua Lakes Council


*These are rural zones of the Operative Rotorua District Plan
Table 1


Figure 3
Source: Rotorua Lakes Council

There was an increase in consents granted for agriculture/farming type activities from 2009/10 to 2011/12 followed by additional household unit and subsidiary household unit. New dwellings, dwelling alterations and boatshed/ jetty were the least common consents granted in the rural zones.

While new dwellings and garage/carport/sleep out are permitted activities in the rural zones the main reasons why these required consent related to encroaching on the front, side and lake buffers; exceeding site coverage; and exceeding building platform and height rules. It is likely that other new dwellings and garage/ carport/sleep out, were constructed within the rules of the Operative District Plan and did not trigger a need for resource consent.

 

Figure 4
Source: Rotorua Lakes Council

 


Figure 5
Source: Rotorua Lakes Council

The table below show issues identified in the rural zones for the reveiw of the Operative Rotorua District Plan, and how these issues were addressed in the Proposed Rotorua District Plan.

 

Issue identified (Operative District Plan)
Issue addressed (Proposed District Plan)
Versatile soils and productive land 
Standards are set as proposed minimum lot sizes. Usable hectares provisions are also retained as a minimum useable land area to protect future productivity of land.
 
Legacy of existing lifestyle lot allocation provisions 
 It is proposed to retain the existing provisions of the operative district plan.
 
Applicability and practicality of minimum lot sizes 
A reduced size of lifestyle lots has been proposed  from 0.5-6ha in the operative plan to 0.25-4ha in the proposed plan.
 
Applicability of usable hectare provisions  
The proposed definition for usable land has been simplified.
 
Suitability and serviceability of rural lots 
New standards are now proposed for all new lots.
 
Lake water quality
Transferable development rights (TDR) are included in the proposed district plan in designated areas of Special Planning Zones 1 and 2 to encourage land use change in these targeted areas. Rules favour a reduction in nutrient losses.
Reviewing of zones
Because of its nature reflecting a residential area, Rural E is now proposed to be Residential 4 Lakeside Settlements.
 Table 2

Of all the provisions in the proposed district plan listed in table 2, transferable development rights (TDR) are the biggest proposed change to district plan rules for subdivision in the rural area. The intent of TDR is to encourage land use change from high nutrient intensive practices such as dairy farming to lower nutrient activities such as residential living. In general, nutrients from residential living are created by sewage which can be treated to reduce its impact on the environment. A number of areas that are in proximity to a lake have been or are due to be reticulated in the near future.

 
Other activities and management practices can also help reduced nutrient loss. This is reinforced by changes in the Proposed District Plan where proposed rules are somewhat more permissive for land use change activities that create less nutrient loss to waterbodies and lakes in particular.
 
A range of activities were granted for ‘other industry and tourism’ (figure 4) and ‘other’ resource consents (figure 5). The most common of these groups was ‘tourism/ recreational activity’, the second most common being ‘tourist accommodation’.
 
There were three consents granted for the building aspects of geothermal prospecting and one consent for a geothermal power station. Resource consents for geothermal fluid exploration or use is administered by regional councils. Although there are only a small number of consents for use of geothermal resources the scale of the consents and their potential for influencing the district’s economy is significant. It is expected that in future more resource consents will be sought for use of geothermal resources for power generation within the Rotorua district.
 


Figure 6
Source: Rotorua Lakes Council

Most subdivisions in the Rural zones resulted in potential new lots. However, boundary adjustments are most common in rural zones than any other zone in the district. This is because trading of land is common between farmers and is usually to optimise productive.     
 

In Summary

Most rural resource consents granted were in the Rural A Zone

  • The general trend for total number of consents from 2006/07 to 2011/12 shows a gradual decrease.
  • Agriculture/ farming type activities granted in the rural zones were mainly for ‘new dairy sheds’ and ‘shed/barns’
  • There was an increase in consents granted for agriculture/farming type activities from 2009/10 to 2011/12
  • There was an increase in consents granted for agriculture/farming type activities from 2009/10 to 2011/12
  • Most subdivisions in the rural zones resulted in potential new lots.

 

Further information sources
 
To see the Operative Rotorua District Plan
Click here
 
To see the Proposed Rotorua District Plan
Click here
 
To make a submission on the Proposed Rotorua District Plan (closes 1st March 2013)
Click here
 
To see the Rural Subdivision Technical Paper
Click here(1.53 MB) 
 
To see the Subdivision Lot Sizes Technical Paper
Click here(1.55 MB)
 
To see the Land Suitability and Subdivision Technical Paper
Click here(2.47 MB)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page reviewed: 20 Feb 2015 1:53pm