Recreational Facilities and use

Satisfaction of lake users
  

What is being monitored?

 
Anticipated environmental results and their monitoring requirement:
  • Retained recreational opportunities on the lakes.

Monitoring:

To triennially survey:
  • Lake use and the adequacy of lake and lakeside facilities and public access to and around the lakes;
  • Lake users’ views on the adequacy to which natural character, water quality and conflicts in lake use are being managed.

Purpose of monitoring

The Lakes A Zone’s natural character, number and types of lakes make it popular for recreational activities. Monitoring the satisfaction of lake users gauges whether expectations for recreational opportunities are being met.

 

Reports available

 
 
2010 Rotorua Lakes Review: Analysis of recreational use and pressures on supporting infrastructure
 

Current trends

 
2006 Environmental Perceptions Survey

Below is a summary of findings from 2006 Rotorua environmental perceptions survey questions, specific to Lakes A Zone.

 
Respondents of the 2006 survey were asked how satisfied they were with adequacy of a number of aspects of lake use.
  • More than eight in every ten respondents (85%) stated that they are either very satisfied (14%) or satisfied (71%) with public access to and around the lakes.
  • A large proportion of respondents also stated that they were very satisfied or satisfied with management of the natural character (8% and 70% respectively) and lakeside facilities (12% and 62% respectively).
  • Almost one quarter of respondents (24%) stated that they were dissatisfied with the management of water quality.


Figure 1. Lake user satisfaction
Source: Rotorua Environmental Perceptions Survey, 2006

7.2.1 Location of Specific Issues

Respondents were then asked to identify the lake(s) they were referring to when they stated that they were dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with a particular aspect of the lake.

  • Lake Okareka appears to be of most concern in relation to management of water quality. 57% of those respondents who stated that they were dissatisfied or very disatisfied with management of water quality identified ‘Lake Okareka’ as one of the lakes they were referring to when making this statement.

 

Figure 2. Location of specific issues
Source: Rotorua Environmental Perceptions Survey, 2006

Lakes Okareka, Tarawera and Tikitapu were the top three lakes for which people had most concern.

2010 Rotorua Lakes Review: Analysis of recreational use and pressures on supporting infrastructure.

Over the 2009/10 summer period a survey and report was carried out on recreational use and the pressures this puts on existing infrastructure (eg lakeside facilities such as public reserves, toilets, launching ramps and jetties). Each site was visited 17 times between December 2009 and February 2010. Both week days and weekends were observed. The report was for all Rotorua lakes. A summary of findings for the lakes within the Lakes A Zone is provided here. Please note that the graphs below show only a small proportion of what was surveyed and of findings from the full report.

Figure 1 shows that the lake with the most number of people observed over the study period was Lake Tikitapu (of all lakes surveyed in the district). The greatest number of vehicles (figure 3) was also observed at this lake, closely followed by Lake Tarawera. Lake Tarawera had the most number of boats observed. The least number of all three variables shown here (people, vehicles and boats) was observed at Lake Okataina.


Figure 3. Number of people observed at four Lakes A Zone lakes (summer 2009-10)
Source: Rotorua Lakes- Infrastructure Pressure Review report, 2010

 

Figure 4. Number of boats observed at four Lakes A Zone lakes (summer 2009-10)
Source: Rotorua Lakes- Infrastructure Pressure Review report, 2010

Figure 5. Number of vehicles observed at four Lakes A Zone lakes (summer 2009-10)
Source: Rotorua Lakes- Infrastructure Pressure Review report, 2010



 

 

Page reviewed: 03 Jul 2019 10:12am