Heritage sites within the Lakes A Zone

 
Number and types of authorities (consents) granted by New Zealand Historic Places Trust to modify, disturb or destroy heritage sites
 
 

What is being monitored?

 
Anticipated environmental results and their monitoring requirement:
  • The adverse effects of use and development on the relationship of the Tangata Whenua and their culture and traditions with their ancestral taonga are avoided, remedied or mitigated.
Monitoring:
  • To biennially monitor using Council records the number of sites of significance to the Tangata Whenua that have been modified, disturbed or destroyed.

Purpose of monitoring

Heritage is a finite resource which gives a place a sense of history and character. Monitoring how and why heritage sites are impacted gives an indication of recognition and protection placed on heritage, so that it is retained for future generations.  

Current trends

Since 2006 only three authorities in the Lakes A Zone were applied for and granted by New Zealand Historic Places Trust, all related to subdivision or construction. These are shown in Table 1. Those reported here are known sites for which permission was sought to disturb or destroy. In the event that an unknown site is uncovered during excavation or any other work, by law, work must stop immediately and New Zealand Historic Places Trust notified and permission sought to continue works. One instance where this occurred was in 2010 where human remains were uncovered in the Lake Tarawera area. Where tangata whenua are known the New Zealand Historic Places Trust work with iwi to achieve a way forward and ensure appropriate tikanga Maori processes are followed.

 
Table 1. NZHPT authorities sought for modification, disturbance or destroying an archaeological site.
Source: New Zealand Historic Places Trust, 2011
 

Authorities from the NZHPT can only be applied for those sites that are known and recorded. Around the Lakes A Zone it is likely that unknown sites and human remains may be uncovered during earthworks or construction, as occupied lakeside settlements were present at the time of the 1886 Mt. Tarawera eruption, and were covered by mud and ash.

In 2011 the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Bill was introduced to replace the Historic Places Act 1993. The bill seeks to change the name of the Historic Places Trust to Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga (Heritage NZ). While the intent of the legislation remains the same, the bill enables Heritage NZ to enter into a covenant with landowners and authorities for exploration to determine if a site is an archaeological site. Processes and timeframes should be streamlined by the bill, and vexatious applications for registration of places can be rejected.

 

In summary

  • Since 2006 only three authorities to modify, disturb or destroy a heritage site were applied for and granted in the Lakes A Zone
  • All three related to subdivision or construction
Further information sources

Page reviewed: 17 Dec 2013 11:57am